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Tecumseh Area Living Magazine

About Us

Established in 2006


Established in 2006 in the offices of The Tecumseh Herald - Homefront began as an exclusive real estate book and quickly morphed into a community lifestyle magazine. Originally mailed exclusively to every home and business in Tecumseh, we now reach far outside the Tecumseh area. The full-color glossy format has become a "must read" and therefore a "must advertise in..." publication.

What We Do


Located 30 miles Southwest of Ann Arbor, we explore and bring to light the rich offerings this corner of Southeast Michigan has to offer. From farm to table recipes, antique offerings, loft renovations, personal stories and exciting events, our seasonal magazine focuses on the charm of small town living.

Spreading the Word


Known for taking immense pride in our work, we feel we succeed when our advertisers do. Our MPA (Michigan Press Association) Award-Winning graphic artists create many successful ad campaigns for local small businesses wishing not to remain small. Our design fee is free and is incorporated in our ad space rates. Businesses using their own agencies are also welcome to spread the word to our avid readers.

Some of our Featured Stories


We like to keep you up-to-date with what's going on right in your own backyard.
Here are some stories from our latest issue of Homefront.

A & B Apiary

A & B Apiary

Sara Hilton     Spring 2019 Homefront

They have structured societies. They dance to give directions. Sometimes the workers will revolt and supersede the queen. Other times the queen will choose her own heir. As winter approaches, they kill off those who don't serve a necessary purpose. These are bees. Within these complex societies, liquid gold is made, sweet honey that not only delights our taste buds, but also embodies vast medicinal qualities.

This liquid gold, and the intricate societies from which it is made, has become a thriving business for Tecumseh-based A & B Apiary. Not only has this bee business, Read more

A Lasting Legacy - The Cooks

A Lasting Legacy - The Cooks

Kerry Hamilton Smith     Spring 2019 Homefront

When passing through Tecumseh, it is easy to be enchanted by the yesteryear charm and beauty. There is so much to love about this city — the boulevard and green spaces filled with seasonal flowers, the stately Victorian homes, the opportunities to enjoy performances at Tecumseh Center for the Arts, the offerings at Evans Street Station and Tecumseh Brewing Company, or even the convenience of medical services. Over the past 66 years, few people have had a more positive impact on Tecumseh than Dr. Carlton and Lynn Cook.

With the sudden passing of "Doc" on February 20, many people have been Read more

Restoration

Restoration

Sara Hilton     Spring 2019 Homefront

"I have enough," he says. "I love what I do. I don't need more. I'm happy." It's a startling thing to hear — I have enough — it is a phrase so rarely spoken. Most conversations involve shiny new plans, the bigger and better, the where we are going from here, because if you aren't on your way somewhere then you are nowhere. Yet this man says, "I have enough."

This is Jeffrey Holmes — former violinmaker, current violin restorer, appraiser, and consultant. In 2018 Holmes moved his studio from Ann Arbor to downtown Tecumseh. It is here, in his Tecumseh studio, that he tells me that he loves what he does, he loves coming to work, and he hopes to work as long as his hands don't shake. Given the caliber of violins that are entrusted to his care, Read more

Taste of Titanic

Taste of Titanic

Sara Hilton     Spring 2019 Homefront

On the evening of April 14, 1912, the most elite Titanic passengers attended a private dinner party in Captain Smith's honor. This private dinner party proved to be their final meal aboard the ill-fated ship. On April 13 of this year, The Greenleaf Mansion Bed and Breakfast in Onsted will hold their fourth annual Titanic Dinner that recreates this last extravagant feast.

Around 24 people will attend this private historical event that seeks to bring to life a piece of history. "Those who attended Captain Smith's dinner party were very wealthy. These were people like the Astors or Guggenheims," said Diane Newell, Greenleaf's innkeeper and chef. Before the event every guest is given an identity of someone who had attended Captain Smith's dinner party. They are also told the identities of others who will be attending so that they can research and study in advance. Read more

The Word on the Street


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